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in the pledge. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain one-minute speeches at a later time today. pursuant to section 5-a of house resolution 5, the chair now recognizes the gentleman from virginia, mr. goodlatte, for the reading of the constitution. mr. goodlatte: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, this morning for only the second time in the history of the house of representatives, we will read allowed the full text of the constitution of the united states. we hope this reading will inspire many more americans to read the constitution. we also hope that this reading will help demonstrate to the american people that the house of representatives is dedicated to the constitution and the system it establishes for limited government and the protection of individual liberty. the text we are reading today reflects the changes to the document made by the 27 amendments to it. those portions superseded by amendment will not be r
.s. states in the southeast of the country. >> syria has summoned the head of the united nations mission in israeli-occupied territory. the issue is an israeli air raid on what syrian officials say was a military research center near damascus. >> the arab league has also condemned the strike, but the actual target is still not exactly clear. some reports suggest a weapons convoy believe to be carrying russian-made anti-aircraft missiles from syria into lebanon. >> we will speak to an expert on the region later. first, this report. >> the israeli government has not issued any statement, but national papers are full of the news. u.s. officials say the raid targeted a weapons convoy headed for members of hezbollah, an ally of the syrian president. but the syrian government denied the existence of the vehicles, saying the israeli planes bombed a research center near damascus. russia says the facts are not yet clear but adds that any air strike would be completely unacceptable. >> we are analyzing the information as we receive it. if the allegations are confirmed, then it is our position this
in for his second term as the 44th president of the united states. good morning. i'm gwen eiffel and welcome to his pbs news hour special coverage of today's nailingration. >> i'm jeffrey brown. it's a bright sunny day here in washington. temperatures remain in the 30's. that's a bit warmer than four years ago for the president's first inauguration. that of course saw a record-setting crowd, nearly 2 million people. no one is expecting anything quite like that this time around but still, folks have been finding spaces on the mall tonight since the sun came up. you can see them setting up spots now. we will be covering the entire inaugural ceremony live. and if you're not at your tv you can watch our live stream on our home page at news hour.pbs.org or follow us on twitter. >> this earmarks the 150th anniversary of the man'spation proclamation. you can see bill and hillary clinton on the podium. there are also people there celebrating the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first preside
use or if they are dangerous and unusual weapons. that was a dichotomy set up by the united states supreme court. if they are in common use like handguns we have to go to the second step of the analysis. if they are dangerous and unusual weapons like machine gun, the analysis would stop there. assault weapons are pretty commonplace. they become popular and firearms in a gun rights community. there are apparently tens of millions of these firearms out there, arguably they are commonly used, but one argument is while they are common they are not commonly used for the core purpose of the second amendment, self-defense. they are poor self-defense weapons. it is hard to maneuver in the home, and projectiles are propelled of such a rate they are likely to pose dangers and who people as they go through walls, endangering family members or neighbors. if that is right, assault weapons would not be thought to be within the scope of the second amendment, and yet i should admit we talked extensively that there are some reasonable arguments you could make against an assault weapons ban. an assa
you around the world in 60 minutes. we begin with nuclear threats against the united states. north korea announced plans to test more nuclekes and more lon range rocket launches. north korea's defense commission calls america the sworn enemy of the korean people. i want to get straight to new york. >> the words are very threatening. it is very incredible to hear them directly threaten united states in that way just ahead of what they say will be another nuclear test. what i'm hearing and what analysts are saying is that is probably how one would have expected them to react. it comes just a day after yet more u.s. action and u.n. action at the security council and more sanction action. most people believe this is not a threat of attacking the united states but certainly the words are threatening to the united states. they say analysts that this is north korea's way of trying to deter any further action from the international community. and that they have no capacity to invade in terms of long range missiles to reach the u.s. it is a serious issue if they do test any kind of nuclear
. >> the constitution of the united states. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states. [applause] >> for myself and for our nation, i want to thank my predecessor for all he has done to heal our land. [applause] in this outward and physical ceremony, we attest once again to the inner and spiritual strength of our nation. as my high school teacher, miss julia coleman, used to say, "we must adjust to changing times and still hold to unchanging principles." here before me is the bible used in the inauguration of our first president, in 1789, and i have just taken the oath of office on the bible my mother gave me just a few years ago, opened to a timeless admonition from the ancient prophet micah -- "he hath showed thee, o man, what is good, and what doth the lord require of thee, but to do justly, and to love mercy, and to walk humbly with thy god." this inauguration ceremony marks a new beginning, a new dedication within our government, and a new spirit among us all. a president may sense and proclaim that new
ever bless the united states of america. [applause] >> the united states marine band. my country tis of thee sweet land of liberty if thee i sing land where my fathers died lad of the pilgrim's pride from every mountain side let freedom ring ♪ let music sweel the beach and ring from all the trees sweet freedom songs let silence break the sound prolonged ♪ our father guide to thee father of liberty to thee we sing ♪ long may our land be bright with freedom's holy light protect us by the might great god, our king ♪ >> pwow. our next distinguished guest is the appellate issue will share with us where -- poet who will share with us words he has composed for this location. occasion. >> one today. one sun rose on us today kindles over our shores greeting the facves of the great lakes acrossng a simple truth the greatplains rooftops, aking upf under each one a story told by oiur silten gestures my face, your face millions of faces each one yawning to life crescendoing to our day the pencil yellow school buses, for it stands, oranges betting our praise. sobered trucks and heavy with
city, defense secretary leon panetta announced the united states military will no longer ban women from serving on the front lines of war. and open up hundreds of thousands of fighting jobs for women service members. the decision reverses the 1994 rule that restricted women from combat roles, even though women frequently found themselves in direct combat in iran and in afghanistan. many fought and died there, in fact, those wars led to the deaths of 152 american service women. the defense secretary leon panetta today said that not everybody will become a combat soldier, but that everyone is entitled to a chance. >> i go on to bethesda to visit wounded warriors and i've gone to arlington to bury our dead, there is no distinction that's made between the sacrifices of men and women in uniform. they serve the wounded and they die right next to each other. >> shepard: the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff recommended the move and the bipartisan group of lawmakers says it supports the lifting of the ban, but critics say they do have some concerns, including the republican congressman and
scattered around the hospital's different departments as well as in the intensive care units who have not been identified yet. it isn't a big number, the people waiting outside for news are desperate. >> it was the end of the summer holiday season in brazil. the last chance to party for many young people due back at school or work on monday. cnn, santa maria, brazil. >> we had a similar tragedy here in the u.s., a fire started at an overcrowded nightclub in rhode island and died. if you can believe it, that was 10 years ago. susan candiotti has a look back at that nightclub fire. >> reporter: in 2003, 100 people died at the station nightclub in west warwick rhode island, where the band great white was performing, pyrotechnics ignited sound proofing material, smoke filled the room, in 1990, arson was the cause of the happy land fire in new york, it killed 87 people. authorities said the bronx club was operating illegally, two years after it was ordered closed because of safety violations. in 1977 fire at the beverly hills supper club in south gate kentucky killed 165 people. among 2400
believed the supreme court's decision in citizens united was wrong, that we needed to know more disclosure of campaign contributions. yet a small minority of senators were able to prevent the bill from even being debated on the floor of the senate, let alone receiving an up-or-down vote. that's just one example. in the last two congresses, consider just some of the measures blocked by the minority, measures that received majority support on a cloture vote: the dream act, bring jobs home act, small business jobs and tax relief act, paying fair share act of 2012, repeal big oil tax subsidies act, teachers and first responders back-to-work act, american jobs act of 2011, public safety employer-employee cooperation act, paycheck fairness act, creating american jobs and ending offshoring act. now, again -- again, it's not that the bill was filibustered. the right to even debate these bills and vote on them was filibustered. one thing, he go on the bill and they filibuster. no, we couldn't even debate it. even though a majority of senators voted for cloture. not 60 but a majority. so the majorit
that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the united states will not ignore your oppression or excuse your oppressors. >> all are equal. all are free, and all deserve a chance to pursue their full measure of happiness. >>> the presidential inauguration is getting under way right here on the capitol, and we have a front row seat. >> here on the national mall, people are staking out their spot to experience this moment in history. >> the sun rises on barack obama's second term. >> we gather because we have chosen hope over fear. unity over purpose. >> on this day, a public celebration of the presidency after a private oath the day before. >> so help you god? >> so help me god. >> on this capitol where so many battles have been fought and will be fought, political rivalries are being set aside in a show of democracy and unity for all the world to see. >> and we remain more than a collection of red states and blue states. we are and forever will be the united states of america. >>> we're live here on the west front of the united states capitol for one of the grandest celebration
. [inaudible] there is a lot of sacred stuff going around in the republican party. they need to be more united and they are not. the american people elected the same people over and over and over. until that stops i don't know how americans are going to move forward. another comment i wanted to make too is that, talking about the left-wing media, that is correct. there is the hannity show -- it doesn't help. >> host: robert costa his comment that there is back and forth behind the scenes that we don't know but? >> guest: the 2012 election house republicans lost a lot of seats but there was no rebellion within the caucus in the internal leadership to break with cantor, boehner or mccarthy, the top three. the only real race he saw was for conference chairman cathy mcmorris-rodgers represented from washington who ran against tom price a representative from georgia for the number four spot. cathy mcmorris-rodgers beat out prices of former chairman of the republican study committee a conservative group in the house so you saw that level the fourth ranking level some fighting. boehner kantian mccart
,000 unnecessary deaths each year in the united states by using what's called a.e.d.'s, which are automatic external defibrillators. this is now allow -- this has now allowed people to be trained to save lives. this act was very important and i'm glad that it was signed as my bill. the fifth one that i'm very proud of that president bush signed is dealing with asthma conditions. self-administration of medication was prevented in schools because they had no drugs allowed and so many children had asthma and they needed epy pen or -- epi pen or abeauty rol, and if it wasn't available they could go into asthma attack. this bill allowed that-tsh these nurses and people at schools to have this type of treatment. the sixth one is the protection of lawful commerce in arms act. it was signed by president george w. bush october 26, 2005. it basically provided civil liability action, protection for companies who are manufacturing, distributing, or imported firearms or ammunition for damages that caused cities and states was suing the manufacturer. it was nuisance suits and i'm glad president bush sign
to the president of the united states asking them to do. and the letter is in i think a copy of letter isn't maxing. also online. but what is so striking for me about that is if you stop for a moment and imagine that instant in time july 1903 where your brother has been kidnapped, and kidnapped a year ago and is in slavery, she's probably visited him. i think the letter signals that so she has seen in chains being worked with dozens of other men out on a farm, on a 20,000-acre plantation in south georgia owned by the most powerful white family in georgia at the time. she knows the desperate state he is in pictures of witness the deprivations being perpetrated against in -- against them. no one of power in her world cares come and to reach a moment of human desperation so great that the only thing you can think of to do still, the only thing left to try is write a letter to the president of the united states, at the magic that that might actually a college some good. the depth of desperation of that moment was so powerful to me when i first found out later. and, of course, what happened, nothing. no
legal in most parts of the united states today. so at the 18-coca is very similar, but on the same mountainside by the same people and they both have our polloi as the principal ingredients. the caffeine and the cocaine are both in their pure form powerful stimulants. caffeine is toxic in its purest form and so i wanted to make a comparison about those, and get into the history of cocaine. that is when it crept into the question of coca-cola. the coca-cola company. that fascinated me because i grew up with those rumors. there was cocaine in coca-cola. started to take the cocaine out of coca-cola in 1902-1903. they met a german cocainemaker who basically was the person who would take out the cocaine in new jersey and we could talk today, that pharmaceutical company, that chemical company is still there today, you can go on the web site and every year see how they have to register coca leaf and register the production of cocaine as a control substance. so i went into that history and found out coca-cola -- absence to coca leaf in the last century and where this comes together today a
of people thought that was in possible. how could we do that? nobody had been in orbit yet in the united states. what kind of rockets are we going to build to be given to do it, and what is the main principle? he was going to build a big spacecraft but we didn't have a rocket to go in. we needed to lift the spacecraft that would do everything. take people up, go to the orbit, land, a comeback and then back into the ocean again. it was a monster. so he needed a rocket for the 1970's. so we had one to carry the injection and the other to carry the big spacecraft until somebody said we met. if we look at what we want to do, which is to get a man on the moon and bring him back, let's look at the settlements of this instead of a spacecraft to do everything. >> 100 years from now -- i'm just throwing a question and i will go back to this -- that you touched on something hundred, 200 years from now or we going to look back at the space program and say how primitive. in the 200 years, where to go from here from new york come to london, how advanced is this thing going to get? >> time will tell o
for giving me the privilege of representing that beautiful and diverse city in the congress of the united states. each of us here today is truly a representative. a representative in the truest sense of the word. to represent the highest hopes and aspirations of the american people. on new year's eve, some of you, a large number of members of congress joined hundreds of people at the national archives building where we observed at midnight the 150th anniversary of the signing of the emancipation proclamation. at midnight there was an enactment of harriet tubman ringing the bill, ringing the bill. and as she rang the bell she said, now we are free. it was quite an incredible moment. and it was one that ushered in what president lincoln would call a new birth of freedom. for his era and for generations to come. that transformative moment in our history is a reminder of the best traditions we have as a people. the ability and obligation of each generation of americans to renew the promise of our founders. to carry forth the torch of progress. to reignite the american dream. this is who we ar
, basically. and so the thing that's hard to get across to people in the united states or these policymakers is that coca is not cocaine. all right? it's -- and indigenous peoples of this hemisphere should not be punished because some people refine it into can cocaine and abuse it. coca, there's great dignity and value to this lease, and there's an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people, and the arrogance by which the united states foreign policy tries to dictate terms to places like bolivia, less than 1% of excess cocaine in bolivia with ends up in the united states. and yet the heavyhanded nature of u.s. policy, you would think this was some kind of flood coming from bolivia the way we dictate terms to that country. and so, now, imagine if the united nations and the audience of the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way, with the contempt they treat coca, right? what would happen if they -- and they've told bolivians and peruvians you have to stop chewing coca which they've been doing for centuries, if not thousands of years. imagine if they did that to the united states, you kno
to keep in mind where we have been and where we are going. we have 20 women in the united states senate. we have 80 men. there are only 16 democratic women in the senate, and four republican. we have a long, long ways to go. wasunited states of america 77th in the world in the percentage of elected women to office. we cannot as an organization take on the whole problem. we believe that we need more women. our piece of the port -- of the puzzle is to elect pro- choice democratic women. the democratic party is for the most part pro-choice. the vast majority of the women we work with our approach was anyway. -- our pro choice anyway. as the organization, when we started women were not running. part of what we do is not so much to choose them and make it happen, but we encourage women to step up and take this on. we need a lot more of that. we do not have enough women running for office in this country. host: why not the republican party? guest: it is not something that women think of doing right away. there is a study done by rutgers a couple of years ago that asks the question of all of t
not the mission of the second airborne are 101st or even the marine corps. 19,000 troops, two units had prepared, had been given advance notice and were prepared. why all this for one african american student who wants to get an education, that -- is because the whole state was in an insurrection from the governors, the state house itself down to the 11-year-old who was starring bricks in the street. it was total chaos, total mayhem . even the mississippi highway patrol had pulled away, so there was year insurrection. the -- it lasted two or three days, the violent part, and after that i was appointed to be a security officer for james meredith and went to school with him. he went to school. i stayed outside with a hand-picked patrol, three jeeps, 12 soldiers and we were there throughout the year. we transfer back and forth. almost one year until he graduated in august of 1963. i was 23 years old. i grew up in an all white neighborhood in south minneapolis. that was pretty much it. and so it was an eye-opening for me, but, again, we were trained, and i'm so proud of what the army did. when you w
support. in 2010, 58 united states senators, a large majority, voted to pass this legislation. if we got 58 votes, then why didn't we get it? because of republican obstructionism, we couldn't even proceed to debate the bill. so this was a filibuster on a motion to proceed to the bill. we got 58 votes but we couldn't even debate it. now, since we just went through a recent debate on rules reform, i want the american people to understand this. republicans, the minority party, have continuously prevented the united states senate from even considering the issue of unequal wages and gender discrimination. millions of women and their families are concerned about the fact they get paid less than their male colleagues. it's unfair. it's unjust. nevertheless, repeatedly, the republicans have filibustered even debating the issue. well, now, madam president, just last week we had a vote in the senate to change some rules, so we made some modifications of the rules, and i trawl hop -- ay hope that those modifications that were made will now enable us to get over this hurdle to bring up the paycheck
defense secretary leon panetta will make a historic change for the united states military. the pentagon will lift the ban on women. more than a quarter of a million, 280,000 women, have served in iraq, afghanistan, or neighboring countries in support of those two wars. susan mcginnis is in washington with more. good morning, susan. >> good morning, anne-marie. today's announcement overturns a 1994 ban on women serving in battlefront operations and it opens up about 230,000 military jobs that until now were closed to women. the new pentagon policy makes women eligible to serve in army and marine infantry units. there's also the potential for them to be part of an elite operations team like the navy s.e.a.l.s and other forces. >> working side by side with special forces teams with pretty cool. >> but in order to join women must be able to withstand the rigid strength requirements with those units. >> there are jobs women can't do physically because they don't have the physical strength to do it. >> the pentagon is opening the door to more women being killed or wounded in action. conflicts
begin about one fifth of the situation of drought. by september, three fifths of the united states was in a situation of drought. from crops failed. estimates of crops insurance range from $30 billion up to $40 billion. the prices went up. consumers impacted not just in the united states, but around the world. in 2011 we had a horrific drought in florida. and many of you who are watching were watching the news coverage were watching impact particularly on newborns and children and could not have been more moved profoundly by what he saw. these are the innocent and most deserving victims. at the same time, we had another drought situation. the impact was significantly less for good reason. we have a research scientist with us from the u.s. geological survey. when he spoke, use one of the most amazing and inspirational that we had heard. second we have -- forgive me for my family -- he is part of the united nations convention. a huge issue. and globally, this is one of the big ones. and requires a lot of attention. and we have climate change review by the university of nebraska at li
in the united states these policy makers is that coca isn't cocaine. indigenous people shouldn't be punished because some people refined into cocaine and abuse state and there's great value and this is an ancient tradition that doesn't harm people and the arrogance by which the foreign policy traced to dictate terms and countries like bolivia less than 1% of any excess cocaine in bolivia and set in the united states. and the heavy-handed nature of the policy would think this is some kind of a flood from bolivia the way that we dictate terms in this country. now imagine if the united nations and the u.n. convention were to treat coffee the way with the content they treat coca what would happen if they tell oblivion's chewing coca which they'd been doing for centuries if not thousands of years imagine if they did that to the united states you have to give up this habit now. she was a major that went to elmhurst college, and in 2001 he comes by europe with the administration to secretly them coffee for one day without notice during finals week as a project so all these students get up in the mo
in the united states -- in many countries against the nets is, if you got now, ukraine, russia, hungary, dozens and dozens of nations are looking at the united states as an evil mention because tunnel men like this person -- gentleman like this person, " have lots of money and have more money than average americans, are going into these nations and promoting the homosexual lifestyle. in russia, they had a riot and had to shut down our professed homosexual demonstration in -- shut down a pro-homosexual demonstration because, was funded b -- was funded by american groups. and the law forbidding the adoption of russian children, a huge part of it was the homosexual lobby. russia was a communist nation, atheist, and these people take god serious now in these countries. host: richard, thanks for the call and thanks for adding your voice and perspective to the conversation. kevin cathcart. guest: i hardly know where to start, but first of all, there are gay people in every country in the world, and the movement for lgbt civil rights around the world are home run in these countries. they are not steer
of immunity is of very specific importance for the united states. as was, for us, the issue of sovereignty and detentions and the continued presence of international forces in afghan villages and the very conduct of the war itself. with those issues resolved, as we did today, part of it, the rest was done earlier, i can go to the afghan people and argue for immunity for u.s. troops in afghanistan in a way that afghan sovereignty would not be compromised, in a way that afghan law would not be compromised, in a way that the provisions that we arrive at through talks will give the united states the satisfaction of what it seeks and will also provide the afghan people the benefits that they are seeking through this partnership and the subsequent agreement. [ inaudible ] >> that's not for us to decide. it is an issue for the united states. numbers are not going to make a difference to the situation in afghanistan. it is the broader relationship that will make a difference to afghanistan and beyond in the region. the specifics of numbers are issues that the military will decide and afghanistan w
have the president of the united states go over and have a cheerleading, ridiculing of republicans' exercise in speaking to the people of the united states of america. as i watched other presidents address crises, the way that they were able to address them and resolve them with presidential leadership -- and that's why we elect presidents, to lead -- they did it by calling the leaders of both parties to the white house and sit around the table and do the negotiations and the discussions and they are sometimes concessions have to be made, compromises have to be made. so what did the president of the united states just do? well, he kind of made fun, he made a couple of jokes, laughed about how people are going to be here for new year's, sent a message of confrontation to the republicans, i believe he said if they think they're going to do that, then they've got another thought coming. i guess i have to wonder, and i think the american people have to wonder whether the president really wants this issue resolved or is it to his short-term political benefit for us to go over the cliff?
this commuter plane that skidded off the runway at newark's liberty airport. it's a united airlines express plane. there were eight passengers and five crew on board. it was coming in from rochester when it made a hard landing and blew out the rear tires. the plane then skidded off the runwayment it came to a stop without hitting anything. no one of injured. >>> we're following this developing story coming in with new information out of algeria. we're trying to get some video. we're getting word that two more americans are among the dead, three americans killed, seven make it out. islamic militants took over this natural gas complex in eastern algeria. there were about 800 people in the plant. most of them freed in two raids that took place. the american death toll sup to three. >>> still ahead on "kron 4 morning news," we'll continue our team coverage of the inauguration day checking in with our political analyst about what's going on in washington, d.c., right now. we'll be right back. new nehoney nenchencof oofs s eegryoguyo and aholehorainra herehe we goe honehoy corncoflakesaknd ndunk
., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.] the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 284 and -- the speaker pro tempore: on this vote the yeas are 285 and the nays are 144. without objection, the bill is passed. without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the house will come to order. the house will come to order. for what purpose does the gentleman from california rise? >> madam speaker, by direction of the democratic caucus, i offer a privileged resolution and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the resolution. the clerk: house resolution 42. resolved, that the following named members be and are hereby elected to the following standing committees -- the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the reading is suspended. without objection, the resolution is agreed to and the
. by executive order of the president of united states, when a criminal commits such a crime as children being slaughtered, those criminals need to be put in the gas chamber within 30 calendar days of their conviction. we nee to start treating murderers like murderers and quit changing the gun-control laws. w 98% of. ho are in compliance with -- 98% of americans are in compliance with gun-control laws. so you put the person in the gas chamber within 30 days. there's the answer. we need good leadership and the white house such as john mccain for president. we would not have these problems. put the murderers in the gas chamber. there's your answer. have a great day. host: a tweet -- the chairman of the judiciary committee in the senator patrick leahy. here's a little bit of him from yesterday. [video clip] >> let's make it easier. talk about gun shows. should we have mandatory background checks at gun shows for the sale of weapons? >> if you are diller, that is already the law. >> that's not my question. please, i'm not trying to place questions, mr. lapierre. >> senator, i do not believe the wa
in at least nine countries including the united states, are waiting to learn who lived and who died. >> pelley: mark, there's a lot of hostage taking in this region for ransom. is there any indication whether that's what this is, banditry, or whether it actually is terrorism. >> reporter: well, the mass brigade and other groups are known to be operating in that area for some time, and they have a history of hostage-taking and ransom demands and smuggling to fund their activities. but with the french intervention underway in mali next door, this incident may be too close, both in time and distance, to be a coincidence. >> pelley: mark, thanks very much. the last time americans were killed by terrorists was also in north africa last september. four died, including the u.s. ambassador, in the attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya. now, u.s. forces are about to go to the aid of the french in mali, and david martin has the late-breaking developments. >> reporter: the u.s. has agreed to airlift a battalion of french troops and tanks into mali, part of a military intervention which has stirr
and credit of the united states of america is not a bargaining chip. >> you know, it looks like republicans are up against another wall. but they're not going to be able to get -- they're not going to be able to get, quite frankly, some things they really want, if they're serious, are important. spending issues. but this is -- he's got them again. >> here's the problem with the republican party being owned by extremists on issues not related to the debt. let me tell you something, the president of the united states, it's laughable that he would talk about republicans not being responsible on debt issues when this president has been in the white house since january the 20th, 2009, and he has yet to do anything significant on social security or medicare. he cut medicare, so he could start a new entitlement program. that's not making medicare more solvent. he hasn't done anything to curb the costs of medical expenses, which he said he was going to do. he did nothing. he struck back room deals with hospitals, big pharma, with special interests and now he's saying republicans are being reckless.
or it will have a huge drag on the united states economy. once again, revisit the issue for the first time in american history. it is not a perfect package. it is something that gets us by while we tackle the large issues in the next congress. >> we are confronted with a bill that, if the vote full voting- age allow us to go over the ceiling or we can try to come together and pass something that neither tside of the aisle will agree with 100 percent. -- 100%. we do not have to can to new fighting. we have got to make sure parrot what i fin. maybe we are moving in the right direction and maybe we are moving toward -- forward. >> we expect them back any minute now. we do not know yet exactly what all happened -- what will happen. what we are hearing from several different sources is the rules committee is going to bring it up and it will be a straight up or down vote on the senate bill. the house will come back into session any minute now. off.ight have to cut an let's hear more voices. here are tweets -- let's hear voices on the phone. linda, what do you think? >> i do not think they know h
of the united states senators. but a mayor, one of our 435 members here, because some of them i know may have to make a mortgage payment, maybe have to make a car payment, maybe have to make an insurance payment or some type of payment. and they may not be able to talk to their bank or whoever they might be, can you wait until the end of the year? i can show you my escrowi'm probably thinking we'll pass a budget in the house, so maybe it might not happen to us. it may not bother the other side too much. that's my opinion. >> mr. ryan, do you have any thoughts on this?this is meant s back to doing its job, to simply folling the law to budgeting. we have a fiscal crisis. we are racking up trillion- dollar deficits. this is not a republican against democrat thing. it's a math thing. this debt crisis is comingall od people for past behavior. this is meant to get congress back to doing its job, to simply following the law to budgeting. we have a fiscal crisis. we are racking up trillion- dollar deficits. this is not a republican against democrat thing. it's a math thing. this debt crisis is coming
. together we stand as we the people. i know and hope that our president of the united states, president obama, is hearing our voices this morning being back in the white house for and other four years. i am a military mom. i want to say this to the republicans. please work with our president of the united states. he is the general in chief for all of us. is gettingely on who more. we can ask. we can write letters. we can twitter and all the settings. but we have to come together. he is the one we voted for. as we let's work together the people. that is my answer to the republicans. host: ok, sylvia. on twitter -- look at some other stories in the news. this is from the houston chronicle, which we get courtesy of the newseum. a shooting close as a local campus. that's the houston chronicle. here in washington, general allen was cleared of misconduct. and e-mail found during betray its inquiry -- during the general petraeus's inquiry involved general allen. whether he exchanged inappropriate e-mails with the same quarter socialite's that prompted david petraeus to resign as cia director.
in perspective, especially since it's simultaneously martin luther king day. >> thank you for uniting this country. left or right, republican or democrat, it's a day to unite the country. >> cbs news coverage of inauguration day will continue in a moment. >>> 1981, reagan moved it from the east front of the capitol to the west. the idea was to no longer toward europe but to the front. and the hostages held in iran for 444 days had been set free. a regular guy with an irregular heartbeat. the usual, bob? not today. [ male announcer ] bob has afib: atrial fibrillation not caused by a heart valve problem, a condition that puts him at greater risk for a stroke. [ gps ] turn left. i don't think so. [ male announcer ] for years, bob took warfarin, and made a monthly trip to the clinic to get his blood tested. but not anymore. bob's doctor recommended a different option: once-a-day xarelto®. xarelto® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with afib not caused by a heart valve problem, that doesn't require routine blood monitoring. like warfarin, xarelto®
oil companies in the united states. they are here because they don't get those kind of benefits in norway or sweden. i get gas royalties out of ohio from a french company. they get 30% they don't even pay tax on. we have to run a country. i think simpson-bowles is the right direction, but i don't think simpson-bowles goes far enough. at one time i thought steve forbes' idea was great, but he wants to keep a certain piece of money that is an entitlement. guest: and makes a very good point that we have got to have the kind of pro-growth tax reform that simplifies the system, broadens the base, lower rates, but that stimulates economic growth and economic development. that means not only getting people back to work but it is the growing economy that creates more revenue, not higher taxes. the growth and the revenues from growth is what we really need to address the deposition and debt. often we don't focus on that enough in the scoring, like the cbo, congressional budget office scoring you see all the time, the revenue from growth is not factored in. in anything we put together a,
castro in his native land, he dedicated his life to opposing communism. as a cia operative units involved in the ill-fated bay of pigs operation. in the following years he was involved in the tracking of the revolutionary che guevara. this is about an hour. c-span: felix rodriguez, the author of "shadow warrior: the cia hero of a hundred unknown battles," let me read you one sentence from page 65 and get your reaction. "i volunteered to assassinate fidel castro and the americans took me up on it." >> guest: well, it was in 1960, when we were in the training camps, actually were in panama then for final training for the bay of pigs and a friend of mine and i thought that it would shorten the war in cuba if fidel were taken out, so we called our case officer at that time in the area of panama where we were, and we volunteered to kill fidel. we were, at that time, about 19 years old then. c-span: how close did you get? >> guest: well, we were given a rifle with a telescopic sight and we were -- three times we attempted to infiltrate cuba, with a boat that had a ukrainian crew on it, plus an
, was their ability to compromise. the very structure of this institution, the united states congress, the very structure of our institution, which joined the people's house, where we are all privileged to serve, with the united states senate, was known as what? the connecticut compromise, or the great compromise. that is the very basis of our founders. too often we forget that while we should never, we should never compromise our principles, we must always, mr. speaker, we must always be prepared to compromise in the service of our principles. a couple weeks ago, "the economist" described another example of compromise -- this one that justice brandeis described as "one of the laboratories of democracy." the state of georgia. conservative republican governor, are former house colleague, and the liberal mayor of atlanta, are clearly at opposite ends of the political spectrum. yet they have managed to bridge the divide with a commitment to results. mr. speaker, together they have achieved significant gains for the good of georgia. mr. speaker, congress and the white house are perfectly capable of
intensive care unit, nurses to lots of care for various patients and they do it well, so why not? the answer is it's impossible in many cases to fit what nurses do into billing codes so you can get paid for it. what you pay for you get and we've got a system that has evolved that has been responsive for what we paid for. if you're going to move from a transaction-based system, in my opinion, to a longitudinal care model of primary care, then you have to move away from transaction-based payment and discrete payment and moved to budgeted payments, longitudinal payments to take care of patients for a period of time without regard to what the billing for the individual service is u.k. and then let providers,.yours, nurses and others and that they how they approach care of their patients without the shackles of being limited by what billing codes well and will not allow for in my opinion. >> any outcomes that appear in washington because i can't find anyone with these ideas to go to when i go to see my doctor. i think that's part of the problem, patients are frustrated. if you see a good model, y
direct part in new un sanctions. this is in the wake of new north korean threats against the united states. cnn pentagon correspondent looked into how dangerous the nuclear capability really is. what are you hearing there sf. >> the rhetoric out of pyongyang is very hot. the question you raise is the one the administration has to take a look at. how real and dangerous is the nuclear threat? >> north korea's latest saber rattles threatening the south just one day after pyongyang said they will have missiles and conduct a new nuclear test leaving now doubt kim jung un is not giving up his father's nuclear program. >> they have the capability to conduct the tests in a way that make it very difficult to determine whether or not they are doing. >> there signs they are ready to test if ordered. >> they are maintaining fairly high state of readiness at the test site. if the order is given from pyongyang to go ahead, they can probably conduct the test in a few weeks. >> satellite shows a tunnel entrance where the device may undergo final assembly, a bunker for personnel and equipment and a
of the united states will be here in attendance. she will be the one who is introducing the closer tonight, if you will, katy perry, the big headliner. i was backstage and saw usher. you are far east movement, i just talked to nick cannon, the host of this shebang here want to. the point, don lemon, of these big stars, really the stars are the children. this whole thing, very near and dear to the heart of both michelle obama and dr. jill biden is military families, not just honoring men and women in uniform, but honoring the spouses and children. and tonight it's about the kids. i just talked to a mother whose husband is about to deploy for time number five. talked to her, talked to her little-year-o 8-year-old. watch. okay, mj. big concert tonight. who are you most excited to see? >> katy perry. >> reporter: and why is that? >> because i know a lot of her songs. like, "i'm wide awake." >> reporter: and this is your first concert tonight, right? >> yes. >> so mom, it's his first concert for your two kids. >> yes. >> you guys live in alexandra, virginia. your husband is about to deploy for
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